Cheese omelette with friends

Or: I’LL EAT EVERYTHING WITH PROTEIN AFTER GOING TO THE GYM (AND YET MORE)

Ingredients

  • A Gruyere cheese omelette/scrambled eggs hybrid
  • Some bacon strips (already cooked, from M&S)
  • LOTS of rocket and watercress salad
  • Sliced red pepper
  • Dash of olive oil of course

I don’t really think this needs preparation instructions!

I was so hungry after today’s training! The only thing I don’t quite like about the bacon strips is they’re so goddamn salty 😟

Bacon and egg muffins

Bacon and egg muffins in the oven tray

My partner surprised me this morning with this breakfast experiment!

They were very tasty and now we want to experiment with other fillings: mushroom? cheese? spring onions? spinach? perhaps something sweet? We’ll see!

Ingredients

  • Eggs (2 per person)
  • Bacon
  • Pepper
  • Milk

Preparation

Takes about 30 minutes.

  1. Turn the oven on to about 180C
  2. Slice the bacon rashers in small pieces, and fry in a pan
  3. Beat the eggs with a dash of milk so it’s a bit more liquid than an omelette
  4. Add some pepper
  5. Mix in the fried bacon
  6. Mix everything thoroughly
  7. Place in the muffin cases – we used silicon cases but I reckon it should work with any other type of case!
  8. And place in the tray
  9. Put in the oven
  10. Bake for about 20 minutes or until you see they start to get colour
  11. Take them off the oven and the cases and serve.

We had them with a slice of toasted bread and a cup of STRONG breakfast tea πŸ’ͺ🏼

Also, even if they look very tall in the picture, they will deflate really quickly as they cool down. Just like other egg souffles…

Funny fact: I had been meaning to bake this type of muffins for a while, and I finally got round to buy these cases this week, but I hadn’t had time to even unpack them yet. And there goes my partner this morning searching for a suitable recipient for the experiment… and voilΓ ! I produce these cases out of my bag, as if per ✨magic✨!

How serendipitous!

Herb omelette

herb omelette
I tried to make coucou, but failed…

This morning I set out with the grand plan of making a delicious coucou, but I didn’t quite succeed. I was too cautious with the amount of herbs, added way less than I should have and so I ended up with a herby omelette, but actually that’s not a bad thing either!

Ingredients

  • Eggs (about 2-3 per person)
  • Herbs:
    • Dill
    • Chives
    • Parsley
    • Spring onions
  • Oil for frying
  • Hazelnuts

For reference, these are the herbs I used, before slicing them. Way too little!

the herbs: dill, chives, parsley, spring onions

Preparation

Takes about 30 minutes, for 2 people.

  1. Wash the herbs and remove any mushy bit if any. We want the best herbs for this!
  2. Then slice them sort of finely, with a knife or scissors, whatever is easier.
  3. I used already roasted hazelnuts, but if yours aren’t, lightly roast them now using a pan on a low heat, until they acquire some colour (I’m assuming you’re using hazelnuts without their skin on!).
  4. Crush the hazelnuts. I used a pestle and mortar.
  5. In a bowl, prepare the eggs: beat them until the yolks and whites are mixed.
  6. Add a generous amount of oil to a pan, then set on a high heat. When it’s hot, add the spring onions first as they’re the sturdiest of the set. Reduce the heat a bit. Stir to avoid burning the onions.
  7. When the onions are soft, add the chives, stir and wait until they get soft too.
  8. Add the parsley and dill, stir.
  9. Add the hazelnuts.
  10. Add the beaten eggs, mix everything nicely.
  11. Set a flat, wide dish aside. Oil it so it becomes a non-adherent dish. We’ll use it to flip the omelette!
  12. Using a spatula try to separate the omelette from the sides of the pan. When it stops breaking apart and seems pretty solid underneath, it’s time to flip it.
  13. Lift the pan from the heat, place it over the oiled dish and quickly flip it so the top bit is underneath now
  14. Lightly oil the pan again
  15. Using the spatula to kindly push, slide the omelette from the dish back to the pan. Holding the pan handle, give it a horizontal shake so the omelette stays flat and contents are nicely distributed (sometimes they can fold)
  16. You might need to flip the omelette a couple more times, just make sure it doesn’t get TOO dry
  17. And eat it!

I served it with one of the pitta breads from Thursday’s halloumi experiment, which IΒ  toasted, sliced and infused with really great Spanish olive oil and some pepper and salt, plus also a few cute tiny tomatoes, because why not?

 

So, not exactly the kind of very green dish I thought I’d produce, but not bad either! It smelled and tasted great.

Halloumi pitta sandwiches

You can’t see it, but there’s halloumi in this [too] ambitious sandwich.
These sandwiches are impossible to eat without making a mess, but they’re really delicious. The first time my partner made them, I requested we had them again the next day! πŸ˜‹

We normally make them as rolls, using tortilla wraps, but today I was feeling innovative and went for pitta breads.

Ingredients

  • Halloumi cheese
  • Cucumber
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce (romaine)
  • Mint leaves
  • Pitta bread or tortilla wraps or similar
  • Olive oil
  • Optional: olives for extra juiciness

Preparation

Slice the halloumi and fry it in a pan until it takes some colour. Initially it might be quite watery, the colour will start showing up once the water evaporates. Then leave aside.

In parallel, have a veggie washing and slicing party. It should eventually look like this, ready to be assembled in your bread or tortilla:

Captain Obvious says: If you’re using pitta breads, you’ll have to slice them open before you put the ingredients in ✌🏻

Place the flattest ingredients first: cucumber, halloumi. Then the rest.

Add a little olive oil, and they’re ready to be eaten!

This is such a great combination of amazing flavours. Also, I will use this opportunity to say that halloumi cheese is one of the best things in Earth 🌟🌍🌟 … possibly one of humankind’s greatest achievements too!

Carrot and potato soup

Yesterday evening I was feeling quite tired and in want of a comforting dinner, but I didn’t feel like walking to the shops once I was home. I scoured the kitchen cupboards and there was this bunch of potatoes whispering “boil us… boil us…”

And so I did!

Ingredients

  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Butter or olive oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Preparation

This is tearfully simple to prepare and cook, which is great when your brain is exhausted.

  1. Either peel the potatoes or wash the skin thoroughly (I sometimes leave the skin in, specially if the potatoes are newer and have no “eyes” πŸ‘€)
  2. Same with the carrots
  3. Cut everything into small cubes or slices, the smaller the faster they will cook
  4. Put them on a pot
  5. Add water, a centimeter or two above the “cover everything with water” level
  6. Cover with a lid
  7. Turn the heat on high, and bring to a boil
  8. When it starts boiling, bring the heat down to medium-low, and let it simmer (maybe also turn on your extractor fan or everything will get very steamy)
  9. How long? it depends on the amounts and the sizes of the cubes! But about 30 minutes. You might need to add extra water if it runs dry–you want a soup, not just boiled vegetables.Β  And you should also test them from time to time; try smashing a cube with a spoon against the pot. If it is soft or breaks down easily, it’s time to turn the heat off!
  10. Depending on your texture preferences, you can mash the vegetables directly in the pot if you have a mashing accessory, or maybe blend it with a blender. Or you can do nothing if things are mushy enough!
  11. Serve on a deep bowl or dish. Add olive oil or butter, salt and pepper. (I’m blatantly stealing my partner’s trick of adding a lot of pepper as it brings a lot of heat to the tongue without adding chilli).
  12. Enjoy!

Other ideas

This method is great to finish off any old vegetables you have lying around. Onions? Beans? Sweet potatoes? Celery? Leek? It’s all good: peel, slice and add to the pot!

It’s also very easy to make a big batch, so you can have dinner for two days (or two people). I haven’t tried freezing this, though.

Some background (the “origin story”)

This totally brings me back to my childhood: we’d have a dish of boiled vegetables as the starter for dinner, then maybe some deli meats and bread, or an omelette, or fish, or something lightweight like that. We call this dish “bollit” in Valencian, or “hervido” in Spanish, which means… boiled!

Although back then we would boil the vegetables without dicing them, so you would get a whole potato in your dish! This also took longer to cook, specially if you didn’t use a pressure cooker. My grandparents didn’t—they seemed to always use the same small weathered pot, and they had to start cooking their bollit every day at 18h for it to be in time for dinner.

If you happened to show up at their home at 20h, you would both get welcomed by an intense smell of boiled onions, and also severely admonished for visiting them so late! πŸ˜‚