Roasting all the things

We didn’t really know what to have for dinner, but we also had a lot of random vegetables that we had to eat before they went off. One pepper… another single potato… an aubergine… a fennel… What to do with all these bits and pieces?

The answer, obviously: roast all of them in the oven!

Then we had them with some olive oil (of course), a bit of chorizo and a fried egg (“for protein” 😅). And I made a salad for lunch the following day ✌🏻

Ingredients

Basically any random vegetable that you might have in your fridge, but in our case:

  • 1 potato
  • 1 aubergine
  • 1 red pepper
  • 1 onion
  • 1 fennel
  • Tomatoes
  • Garlic cloves
  • Olive oil
  • Paprika
  • Pebrella (if you have it) or oregano
  • A piece of chorizo (optional)
  • One egg per person (optional)

If you skip the chorizo and eggs, this could be a totally vegan dish. Do as you feel!

Preparation

  1. Put some water on a pot so we can lightly boil the fennel before roasting it (that way it will be tender). Set the heat to high.
  2. Set the oven to 200C
  3. Cut any ugly bits off the fennel, chopping off the ends and perhaps the outside leaves. Wash off any soil. When the water is boiling, add the fennel to it.
  4. Prepare one or more trays (depending on how many vegetables you want to get rid off), oiling them lightly or perhaps adding some aluminum wrap if you don’t want things to stick to your tray
  5. Peel or wash very thoroughly the potato (sometimes I like to keep the skin), and slice lengthwise. Lightly cut the flat sides so they get better cooked. Then place on the trays.
  6. The aubergine is pretty tedious to peel, so I don’t. Wash it carefully and slice it like the potato, and place on the tray too.
  7. Peel a few garlic cloves, slice them and place them on the aubergine slices. It adds a nice garlicy flavour!
  8. Peel the onion, slice it in four parts and place on the tray.
  9. When the fennel seems to have softened a bit, take it out of the pot, and (slice in 3 or 4 parts, place in tray)
  10. This is our tray of things that will take longer to cook: Aubergine, potato, fennel and onion
    Add a bit of olive oil and salt, and place in the oven so it starts cooking. 
  11. And now for the tray of delicate things that take less to cook: the tomatoes and pepper.
  12. Wash the pepper and slice longitudinally. Remove any seeds, and place on the tray.
  13. Wash the tomatoes and slice in somehow thick slices (don’t go too thin or they just evaporate down to nothing). Place in the tray, and then add some olive oil to everything, and sprinkle with pebrella or oregano over the tomatoes.  And place it in the oven.Pepper and tomatoes on the tray
  14. Keep an eye on the food as it cooks. Some things take less to cook, so you might need to take a tray out and remove some of the ingredients to prevent things from burning. Vegetables being roasted in the oven
    TIP: If it’s hard to look at the tray underneath because the oven light is on top, you can use your mobile phone’s flashlight function as a “lantern”.
  15. When things are cooked to your liking (e.g. some people prefer the potatoes more done and crispy, others prefer them tender…), arrange them in dishes, ready to serve. Roasted vegetables
  16. Optional: Right after turning the heat in the oven off, take a piece of chorizo, peel the skin off, slice it in two and place them in the oven to gently warm up while we cook the eggs. This will release its smokiness and soften the fats, so it’ll take a darker colour. Chorizo pieces
  17. Optional: Fry the eggs, and place on the dishes. Fried egg
  18. Add some paprika on top of the potatoes. I’m using smoked paprika like the one in this recipe.
  19. And there we go! Ready to eat 😋

Roasted vegetables with egg and chorizo

We had never roasted fennel before, and this was such a nice surprise. It turns way mellower than when raw, and the aniseed flavour is sort of surfing on top of a gentle wave of sweetness. It conjured visions of walking across fields on a slightly chill, crisp Autumn Sunday morning; muddy boots and all.

You would wonder: can a roasted fennel do ALL THAT to your mind? And my answer is that the only way to find out is to try it by yourself.

 

“English baking” workshop at the Bread Ahead baking school

What we baked at the course
How do you like my “rustic” arrangement of breads and cakes? My pop up stall is coming…

We attended this afternoon workshop at their Borough Market baking school a few weeks ago. It was actually my Christmas present, but we have been so busy lately that we could only find time in March to do it!

It was really fun, the teacher was absolutely phenomenal and enthusiastic, and I am really embarrassed to admit that I did not remember her name, but thank you, Teacher!

I was a bit scared about baking because I have tried to bake breads in the past and they always ended up really flat and tough. But the workshop helped me realise what my main issues were:

  1. not enough time or the wrong environment for the yeasts to do their business,
  2. often, the capital sin: adding more flour instead of kneading more when the dough is sticky.
  3. I wasn’t really kneading!

And now I’m not terrified about baking anymore! 🙂

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Thai (?) green curry

Thai green curry

Note: I’m not from Thailand, so please excuse any horrible things I did to your (sort of) national dish 🙂

I had a horrible day/week, and was really upset by various things that had happened, so I decided the best way to leave that behind me was to focus on cooking something comforting.

Somehow I thought of green curry, but I had not cooked this in a very long time—would I still remember how to do it?

For extra challenge, I decided to try and make it vegan, which is not very hard as the only ingredient from animal source is the chicken. I replaced it with tofu instead. Done!

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What happened in March?

I was pretty absent from this blog during March. My apologies!

Since the last post, I underwent a dental surgery (ew) which prevented me from eating “grown up food” for a couple weeks, as I literally had a hole on my gum (!) and my jaw hurt.

Then when things were settling down I started wearing clear dental braces, which prevented me from eating “solid-ish” food for a couple more days as my teeth and jaw were sore, and made me develop new food ingestion strategies. I think I might write about these as they might be useful for other people in my situation (and their relatives and friends). But not now.

It’s been a while until I have settled down again, as there have also been lots of other events happening-trips to places, visiting new restaurants, attending a baking course… the lot!

Hopefully I can go back to a normal-ish schedule. Or at least a more frequent posting schedule. That would please me already as I have so much to write about in my mental backlog!

Herbal teas, locally brewed drinks, and fusion cuisine

I was in Spain for a few days last week. On the way in I flew with hand baggage only. But the way back involved checking in my previously almost empty bag (I pack very lightly), as it had been loaded with a (figurative) ton of local-ish produce:

  • sobrasada! and four different cheeses from various parts in Spain
  • spelt based spaghetti with spirulina and other sea weeds (I love trying out new things)
  • Organic Spanish Marcona almonds
  • three bottles of Antoñita La Moderna, a locally brewed beer which I had just tried and liked, so my beerofiliac spouse can try it
  • a bottle of herbero – a drink made out of a sweet aniseed digestive base with added local herbs from the Serra de Mariola mountains
  • sweet chamomile, elder, mate (to brew)
  • And since this is the season of colds: locally sourced thyme (to brew) and eucalyptus (to inhale)

I couldn’t stop thinking this was quite a funny bag, and also hoping the bottles would not be smashed despite my best packing efforts. I normally don’t take liquids with me so I don’t have to check them in, because then I’m all worried they’re going to be smashed when loaded/unloaded. Stupid airport security procedures… 🙄

Since I came back we’ve been enjoying all manners of unusual culinary combinations; let’s call them fusion cuisine:

Chestnut mushrooms and spirulina and spelt spaghetti
Dinner: chestnut mushrooms and spirulina and spelt spaghetti
Eggs on sobrasada on toast, with spring onions
Breakfast: eggs on sobrasada on levaine toast, with spring onions

And some not-so-weird: thyme infusion, or thyme tree – perfect to soothe sore throats, or just to enjoy its fragrant smells:

Thyme infusion

We also tried the elder infusion; I had never had that one before. I fell like a baby afterwards, not sure if it’s related or not, but there you go!