Bastardised Staffordshire oatcakes

Bastardised Staffordshire oatcakes

I cooked these loosely following this recipe from Felicity Cloake.

Except for the fact that I halved the amounts for the batter, changed the types of flour, and also didn’t use the suggested savoury fillings. Hence the bastardisation 😂

Ingredients (for 3 very generous portions)

  • For the batter:
    • 50 g strong wholemeal flour
    • 50 g semolina flour (I wanted to get rid of it)
    • 125 g oats, both rolled and whole mixed (I didn’t bother grinding them)
    • 125 ml milk
    • 100 ml almond milk
    • 225 ml water
    • 5 g yeast
    • Coconut oil (for frying)
  • For the filling and garnishing:
    • One apple
    • One banana
    • Agave syrup
    • Cinnamon
    • Coconut shavings

Preparation (30 min preparing + overnight + 30 min cooking)

  1. Mix the flours and oats together in a bowl
  2. Add the milks and water to a pot and warm it up “to blood temperature”. I used a thermometer to make sure it wouldn’t go past 35 C, as I’m too scared to tip my finger into the pot
  3. Then take a bit of liquid aside into a small container, and mix the yeast there, cover and wait until it gets bubbly when the yeast starts working
  4. Then tip the yeast mix into the pot, dissolve well into the liquid
  5. Pour the liquid into the flours bowl, and mix well
  6. Cover it with cling film, and leave the bowl outside for an hour so the yeast can do its bubbly thing before putting it in the fridge overnight, or put it in the fridge straight away. I actually left it outside for about 4 hours because I was curious as to what would happen.
  7. Next morning the batter will be beautifully bubbly.  But we’ll gently mix it before we fry it, to make sure all the oats are distributed evenly.
    Bubbly oatcake batter
  8. Thinly slice the fruits we’ll use for the filling. I used a banana and an apple.
    Sliced apple and banana
  9. Put oil on a pan (I am terrible, so I used coconut oil) and bring to a high heat.
  10. When it’s hot, pour enough batter to form a not-super-thick pancake. Also add a few fruits in.
    Oatcake fillingsI feel this batter is quite unlike normal pancake batter, it is less liquid and it gets quite bubbly, which I enjoyed witnessing.
  11. When it looks as if the underneath side is pretty cooked, carefully fold the pancake in half (be careful with the filling not being in the way—it helps if you make sure they’re all in one side only) and lightly squeeze it with the spatula to make sure the batter is well distributed.
  12. You might want to flip the folded oatcake a couple of times until it looks done (magically, they don’t seem to burn as easily as pancakes).
  13. Then remove to a dish, and move on to the next oatcake, until all the batter has been consumed.
  14. I garnished them with some cinnamon, coconut flakes and agave syrup (I’m really terrible, yes).Bastardised Staffordshire oatcakes

Sorry to all Staffordshire natives I might have terrorised with this recipe, but we just didn’t have any bacon at home this morning and the shops opened at 12 as it’s a Sunday 💁🏻

But to be quite honest, they were great and they worked nicely with the cold brewed coffee that my partner prepared, so I have zero regrets 😜

Banana porridge

Banana porridge

After a dine out experience that gave us a sort of funny tummy, we were feeling in dire need of a soothing breakfast, so I figured that a porridge would be a good answer to that need!

Ingredients

  • 40-45 grams of oats per person
  • 250 ml of liquid (milk, coconut milk, or any type of “mylk” or “m*lk” you like) per person
  • Half a ripe banana per person
  • Cinnamon

Optional toppings:

  • Coconut
  • Hazelnuts
  • Chia seeds
  • Dried cranberries
  • A dash of kefir
  • Sugar or syrup or sweetener

Preparation

This will take about 30 minutes, depending on how many people are you cooking for.

  1. Place the milk and oats on a pot, and turn the heat on to a high setting
  2. Bring to a boil
  3. Allow to simmer for about 15 minutes, or until the oats are fairly ‘swollen’. Perhaps add more liquid during cooking if they have absorbed too much of it! Stir frequently so nothing gets stuck to the pot, and the result gets creamier.
  4. In parallel, you can peel and slice the banana(s)
  5. Place on deep bowls or dishes.
  6. Add sweetener to taste – I added a dash of agave syrup on top. Since you’re using cinnamon and banana, which is naturally sweet you don’t need to add a lot of sugar to the oatmeal
  7. Add cinnamon… and any other toppings you fancy!

Once you have the base, this is all about adding whatever you like (or have handy). For example, I added the sliced bananas, then a bunch of dried coconut, some hazelnuts, dried cranberries and chia seeds which look really cool and in theory have a lot of protein but there’s so few of them they can’t really make much of a difference 😜

I’ll admit I normally I cook porridge in the same bowl, with the microwave, but if you’re cooking for two (or more) it’s just easier to use the stove. Plus, it allows you to better control the dryness of the mixture and you can correct on the spot if it’s getting too dry 🙂

Chamborado

This is quite a heavy breakfast, so I don’t recommend you go for this if you’re expecting to have a substantial lunch afterwards. But now that it’s a bit colder, this is the kind of comforting chocolatey thing I look forward to on Sunday mornings 🙂

Ingredients:

  • 140 g round rice (paella, ‘bomba’ or risotto rice should work)
  • 100 g dark chocolate
  • 30 g sugar
  • any milk you like – I used coconut milk, or just water if you’re feeling spartan
  • some exotic fruit like mango or papaya to balance the sweetness, at room temperature
  • maybe other decorations like desiccated coconut
  • if you’re very fancy, maybe edible flowers? I have no idea where to get these. Maybe a couple mint leaves would be nice too 🤔

Preparation

  1. Prepare the chocolate: with a big knife, cut it into shavings so it’s easier to melt later. Leave aside.
  2. Prepare the fruit, if it’s not already pre-sliced, do peel and cut the mango in squares and leave aside.
  3. On a pot, put 280 ml of milk to start with, and bring to a boil
  4. When it starts boiling, add the rice, and reduce the heat so it doesn’t evaporate super quickly. Put a lid on, leave to cook and occasionally stir to avoid it getting stuck to the bottom.
  5. When it starts looking like almost all the liquid has been absorbed, you need to start adding extra water in small quantities. I suggest you use warm water as it won’t stop the process that much. Add spoonfuls of water and stir. You don’t want the rice to be overcooked, but you don’t want it raw either. So try a grain from time to time. A risotto spoon is very helpful to gently massage the rice and bring out the starch.
  6. Once the rice has released lots of its starch and it’s looking creamy, add the sugar too, stir, and see if it’s sweet enough, then correct by adding more if you want more of a kick (although take into account whether the chocolate you add later has sugar as well).
  7. In parallel, put the chocolate shavings to melt in another pot, preferably using a bain marie to avoid burning it. Or you can wait until later and just mix everything together. (I used a bain marie).
  8. When the rice is nicely cooked, and the grains don’t have a hard core anymore, add the chocolate (it should be nicely melted by now!). Or add the shavings, but bring the heat to the lowest so you don’t burn the rice. Keep gently stirring until it’s all mixed in.
  9. Serve on a deep dish or bowl. Add the fruits and any decoration you want. You could add a splash of milk to have some contrast.
  10. … and eat it! It’s very nice when warm, and the fruit provides some fresh contrast against the chocolate richness.

If you use coconut milk like I did, this is fully vegan, although it’s not very dense and so when adding the final splash it just looks very watery.

This is inspired on a recipe from Symmetry Breakfast’s book, but since I’m a rice snob I decided to ignore his rice amounts and proportions (also he doesn’t go in such detail about how to cook the rice as I went—you can tell that I have high rice standards 😏). I also reduced the amount of sugar, but he was suggesting using tablea, which I had no way to source in a timely manner.

My version was a bit drier and less creamy that I expected. I should I have added way more milk or water. Oh well, I guess I can always repeat this!

Also: Apologies if you’re Filipino and this version is insulting to you 💁🏻