A trick to flip omelettes without special accessories

I cook a lot of omelettes, and when I add lots of fillings they get hard to flip. I do not have an special accessory to flip omelettes because our kitchen is very small and we have to be selective about gadgets. But the fact is… you can make do without special accessories here. All you need is an additional dish!

  • Set the flat, wide dish aside. Oil it evenly, so it becomes a non-adherent dish. We’ll use it to flip the omelette!
  • When the omelette looks mostly cooked in one side, use a spatula to separate the omelette from the sides of the pan.
  • Lift the pan from the heat, hover it over the oiled dish and quickly flip with a confident wrist movement, it so the top bit is underneath now
  • Lightly oil the pan again.
  • Using the spatula to kindly push if it gets stuck, slide the omelette off the dish and back to the pan.
  • Grab the pan handle, and give it a horizontal shake so the omelette stays flat and contents are nicely distributed. Sometimes they can fold… so carefully unfold the omelette using the spatula. Sometimes it will just be a folded omelette, and it might look ugly in one side, but pretty on the other. So simply serve it with the pretty side up 😀
  • You might need to flip the omelette a couple more times, just make sure it doesn’t get TOO dry

A good trick to ensure it is still moist inside is to cook with a reasonably high heat. So it will seal the outside, but keep the inside a bit moist still. If you cook this on a very low heat, you’ll dry out the whole mixture (and it’ll take forever too). If you cook it on a very high heat, you might end up with a burned omelette. So keep an eye on the temperature.

 

Chickpea omelette

This morning, I was wondering what to have for breakfast when I remembered I had a bunch of chickpeas leftover from yesterday’s dish: rice with Swiss chard. And I had an idea: why not have a chickpea omelette?

Like that dish, this is also a very economical dish, and quite easy to make. The hardest skill required is to know how to flip the omelette without breaking it, although I gave some tips for that on the herb omelette recipe.

Ingredients (for 2-3 portions)

  • 6 eggs
  • 1 onion
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Parsley
  • Half a 400g tin of chickpeas, drained
  • Olive oil

Preparation

Takes about 45 minutes.

  1. Mash the chickpeas using a fork or a mashing accessory
  2. Peel and thinly chop the onion
  3. And the garlic clove
  4. Place some olive oil on a pan, set on a high heat and start frying the onion and garlic
  5. Crack the eggs and pour them on a bowl, and whisk them
  6. Wash and chop the parsley, add to the bowl
  7. Add a touch of salt
  8. Add the chickpeas to the bowl and mix everything vigorously so there are no lumps of chickpea paste – this is how it’d look like:Chickpea omelette mixture
  9. When the onion and garlic are fried (onion soft, garlic golden), add a touch more oil to the pan and then add the egg, chickpea and parsley mixture to the pan, and mix everything together
  10. Set to a high heat, and cook the first half
  11. Then using the tricks on this post, flip the omelette and cook the other side
  12. Serve and enjoy!

This is a dish which is often cooked with the leftovers of a popular stew called “cocido”, instead of using tinned chickpeas or specifically cooked chickpeas. That makes the omelette even tastier, as the veggies have all the flavour from the stew! Plus also the tinned chickpeas are a bit too hard for this dish and it takes longer to mash them.

When using stew leftover, you end up with a more colourful dish as it might contain all sorts of vegetables: potato, carrot, green beans, cauliflower, cabbage… and it’s fairly common to actually make vegetable croquettes with these.

It just occurred to me that this could also work very nicely with a touch of spice on it to add some ‘heat’ – perhaps some red chilli.

The other great thing about this dish is its versatility: you can have it for breakfast, or in your lunch box (as it keeps and warms up nicely), or even for dinner – it’s a very common Monday dinner (as you might have had the stew on Sunday).

Herb omelette

herb omelette
I tried to make coucou, but failed…

This morning I set out with the grand plan of making a delicious coucou, but I didn’t quite succeed. I was too cautious with the amount of herbs, added way less than I should have and so I ended up with a herby omelette, but actually that’s not a bad thing either!

Ingredients

  • Eggs (about 2-3 per person)
  • Herbs:
    • Dill
    • Chives
    • Parsley
    • Spring onions
  • Oil for frying
  • Hazelnuts

For reference, these are the herbs I used, before slicing them. Way too little!

the herbs: dill, chives, parsley, spring onions

Preparation

Takes about 30 minutes, for 2 people.

  1. Wash the herbs and remove any mushy bit if any. We want the best herbs for this!
  2. Then slice them sort of finely, with a knife or scissors, whatever is easier.
  3. I used already roasted hazelnuts, but if yours aren’t, lightly roast them now using a pan on a low heat, until they acquire some colour (I’m assuming you’re using hazelnuts without their skin on!).
  4. Crush the hazelnuts. I used a pestle and mortar.
  5. In a bowl, prepare the eggs: beat them until the yolks and whites are mixed.
  6. Add a generous amount of oil to a pan, then set on a high heat. When it’s hot, add the spring onions first as they’re the sturdiest of the set. Reduce the heat a bit. Stir to avoid burning the onions.
  7. When the onions are soft, add the chives, stir and wait until they get soft too.
  8. Add the parsley and dill, stir.
  9. Add the hazelnuts.
  10. Add the beaten eggs, mix everything nicely.
  11. Set a flat, wide dish aside. Oil it so it becomes a non-adherent dish. We’ll use it to flip the omelette!
  12. Using a spatula try to separate the omelette from the sides of the pan. When it stops breaking apart and seems pretty solid underneath, it’s time to flip it.
  13. Lift the pan from the heat, place it over the oiled dish and quickly flip it so the top bit is underneath now
  14. Lightly oil the pan again
  15. Using the spatula to kindly push, slide the omelette from the dish back to the pan. Holding the pan handle, give it a horizontal shake so the omelette stays flat and contents are nicely distributed (sometimes they can fold)
  16. You might need to flip the omelette a couple more times, just make sure it doesn’t get TOO dry
  17. And eat it!

I served it with one of the pitta breads from Thursday’s halloumi experiment, which I  toasted, sliced and infused with really great Spanish olive oil and some pepper and salt, plus also a few cute tiny tomatoes, because why not?

 

So, not exactly the kind of very green dish I thought I’d produce, but not bad either! It smelled and tasted great.