Bastardised Staffordshire oatcakes

Bastardised Staffordshire oatcakes

I cooked these loosely following this recipe from Felicity Cloake.

Except for the fact that I halved the amounts for the batter, changed the types of flour, and also didn’t use the suggested savoury fillings. Hence the bastardisation 😂

Ingredients (for 3 very generous portions)

  • For the batter:
    • 50 g strong wholemeal flour
    • 50 g semolina flour (I wanted to get rid of it)
    • 125 g oats, both rolled and whole mixed (I didn’t bother grinding them)
    • 125 ml milk
    • 100 ml almond milk
    • 225 ml water
    • 5 g yeast
    • Coconut oil (for frying)
  • For the filling and garnishing:
    • One apple
    • One banana
    • Agave syrup
    • Cinnamon
    • Coconut shavings

Preparation (30 min preparing + overnight + 30 min cooking)

  1. Mix the flours and oats together in a bowl
  2. Add the milks and water to a pot and warm it up “to blood temperature”. I used a thermometer to make sure it wouldn’t go past 35 C, as I’m too scared to tip my finger into the pot
  3. Then take a bit of liquid aside into a small container, and mix the yeast there, cover and wait until it gets bubbly when the yeast starts working
  4. Then tip the yeast mix into the pot, dissolve well into the liquid
  5. Pour the liquid into the flours bowl, and mix well
  6. Cover it with cling film, and leave the bowl outside for an hour so the yeast can do its bubbly thing before putting it in the fridge overnight, or put it in the fridge straight away. I actually left it outside for about 4 hours because I was curious as to what would happen.
  7. Next morning the batter will be beautifully bubbly.  But we’ll gently mix it before we fry it, to make sure all the oats are distributed evenly.
    Bubbly oatcake batter
  8. Thinly slice the fruits we’ll use for the filling. I used a banana and an apple.
    Sliced apple and banana
  9. Put oil on a pan (I am terrible, so I used coconut oil) and bring to a high heat.
  10. When it’s hot, pour enough batter to form a not-super-thick pancake. Also add a few fruits in.
    Oatcake fillingsI feel this batter is quite unlike normal pancake batter, it is less liquid and it gets quite bubbly, which I enjoyed witnessing.
  11. When it looks as if the underneath side is pretty cooked, carefully fold the pancake in half (be careful with the filling not being in the way—it helps if you make sure they’re all in one side only) and lightly squeeze it with the spatula to make sure the batter is well distributed.
  12. You might want to flip the folded oatcake a couple of times until it looks done (magically, they don’t seem to burn as easily as pancakes).
  13. Then remove to a dish, and move on to the next oatcake, until all the batter has been consumed.
  14. I garnished them with some cinnamon, coconut flakes and agave syrup (I’m really terrible, yes).Bastardised Staffordshire oatcakes

Sorry to all Staffordshire natives I might have terrorised with this recipe, but we just didn’t have any bacon at home this morning and the shops opened at 12 as it’s a Sunday 💁🏻

But to be quite honest, they were great and they worked nicely with the cold brewed coffee that my partner prepared, so I have zero regrets 😜

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